Integrative Nutrition Blog

IINsider’s Digest: Kale Gets Steamy, Stretching Sustainable Food Dollars, and more…

October 5, 2012

Kale is getting steamy, and not just in the kitchen! A brain-foods expert and a professional chef teamed up to create this saucy spinoff of the infamous 50 Shades, to introduce "kale virgins" everywhere to its impressive range of health benefits. (Well + Good)

Speaking of kale, Clean Plates (founded by 2005 grad Jared Koch) continues its collaboration with Whole Living, interviewing sustainable chef John Marsh about his favorite ways to cook the healthful leafy green.

At last weekend’s live conference, guest lecturer (and 1998 grad) Andrea Beaman inspired us to invest in our health. With a few savvy tips, healthy eating can come at a surprisingly moderate price. In her book, Long Way on a Little, Shannon Hayes talks about stretching those sustainable food dollars, and making the most of the scraps. (Grist)

Have you got what it takes to eat unprocessed foods for an entire month? Then join the Eating Rules "Unprocessed October" challenge!

Genetically engineered seeds are reputed to increase crop yield and reduce the need for pesticides. But there's one problem: GE crops have not proven to fulfill either of these promises and - what's more - have become the primary drivers behind our ever-increasing rate of pesticide use. (Civil Eats)

A modern teenager finds his "field of dreams" in this inspiring story about learning to appreciate where our food comes from. (New York Times)

The varying quality of the food service in hospitals can be both frustrating and dangerous for patients with serious dietary restrictions. In the UK, specialized training is hoping to remedy the disconnect between patients' needs and the caterers' understanding of these medical conditions. (BBC News)

An academic study in Scotland suggests that children who grow up eating fast food on a regular basis may grow up to have a lower IQ. These results have socio-economic implications, as families with higher incomes reported serving freshly cooked food more often, while lower class families often relied on fast food. (The Daily Star)

Ever wonder how far the effects of pollution can go? Look to Antarctica. A team researching plankton in the far South discovered more than they bargained for, when they found a shocking amount of plastic-based debris on the relatively untouched continent. The toxic implications for wildlife are inherently connected to the health of our food chain. (Smithsonian)

What's actually inside the fortified "peanut butter cure"? NPR breaks down the contents of this highly effective supplement for malnourished children, and explains how it might be used in pro-active, preventative measures. (NPR)

It's pepper season! From green to yellow, sweet to habanero, autumn is the time to give this vitamin-packed veggie some love. Also in season? Apples - organic ones. They may look ugly, but their flesh is just as sweet. (NPR, Washington Post)

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