Integrative Nutrition Blog

Is Cockroach Milk a New Superfood?

October 21, 2016

Image via Shutterstock

At Integrative Nutrition, we understand that the field of nutrition is ever growing and advancing and it’s important to stay updated on this changing landscape. But we wouldn’t have thought that cockroach milk would be the next thing to hit the health and wellness scene…

You heard right: Cockroach milk.

A recent CNN Health report revealed that this protein-rich insect milk may someday serve as a human superfood.

Unlike regular dairy milk, cockroach “milk” is a liquid secreted by the roach’s version of a human uterus, the brood sac, which then takes the form of protein crystals in the guts of baby cockroaches. Scientists have found that Pacific Beetle Cockroaches feed their bug babies this formula to aid in growth and development.

What’s most noteworthy is just how powerful and nutrient-dense it is. Researcher Leonard Chavas explains that these crystals have three times the energy of an equivalent mass of buffalo milk, which is about four times the equivalent of cow’s milk. Researchers were able to determine that this formula is, in fact, a complete food  – containing protein, essential amino acids, lipids and sugars.

While it may seem like an unusual protein source, the fact that cockroach milk contains all the elements of a complete, whole food makes it something to consider.

At Integrative Nutrition, we are all for the safe consumption of nutrient-rich foods that help the body perform, maintain function and fight disease. While further research is needed, who knows, cockroach milk might be a future alternative for those with dairy or soy allergies or intolerances.

Would you give cockroach milk a try? Share with us in the comments below!

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